Maria Quigley

Maria Quigley

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH Maria Quigley

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I use the medium of printmaking and photography to translate my ideas. As an artist I struggle with the perfect ending point… it never arrives. I utilise the medium of film photography to discipline an ending point in the creative process, using the first shot as the end result. I present the photographs in their raw form with no digital alterations, cropping, or manipulation. I made two books entitled “Along the Southern Coast”, in order to translate feelings of emotion when travelling. A catalyst for this approach was the concept of ‘psychogeography’, which looks at the emotional and psychological meaning an individual attaches to place. When taking photographs I try to capture moments that make me laugh and I hope to share these moments with my audience. Often this will take the form of the obscure or unexpected. In human terms it will be about discovering who a person is and trying to capture that in a movement or facial expression.

Inspired by Psychogeography the series of books, “Along the Southern Coast” provides a photographic memoir of wandering. The first book records a solitary journey along the South Coast of England in February 2016. The concept of psychogeography encompasses a journey that happens both physically and mentally through aimless wandering. An individual encounters curious events that shift patterns of emotion. The journey that is documented here, was one of stark landscapes, desolate, mostly without human presence.

The second book documents meeting individuals encountered along the way and making journeys with conversation. Through human encounters spirits can be changed, emotions altered and wisdom gained. In this book I aim to produce an account of these moments captured in time. There are people who wander with purpose, looking for something, and there are people who wander lost, in essence allowing themselves discovery that is not sought but occurs, crossing paths into each individual’s realm of emotion and being.

Shelley Hornstein, in Losing Site: Architecture, Memory and Place, poses the idea that from a photograph or postcard we can transport architecture from its physical site to locations in the imagination. The photographs in this book seek to provide the viewer with this kind of immersive experience.

maria@taquigley.com

maquigley.com